Kodama

Kodama solid perfume

Today I’ll be talking about the first scent blend I conceived. I had been studying and using essential oils for several years already at the time, but hadn’t really strayed beyond mixing two or three oils at a time. Which is nice, as far as it will take you. Sometimes what you have to say can’t be compressed into a tidy little soundbite however. Spending time in nature has always been an important source of inspiration for me, right from early childhood when my parents would take me on camping trips along the Oregon coast in our musty wall tent. The sights, sounds and smells of those excursions are with me still, the dazzling sunlight glinting off the waves on a rare sunny day, the silken mist wrapping itself around me on a more common foggy day, the crash of the surf, the cascading song of the wood thrush, the luxurious cushion of moss covering nearly every surface of the forest floor.

The wonderfully wild Oregon coast

After moving away from my beloved coastal forests, I was filled with longing for those craggy, misty wild places I had wandered through. I wanted to create an immersive experience, a scent picture that I could dive into whenever I wished, regardless of whether or not I had the time to go on a long, lazy hike through the woods. To do this I would have to think in a new way, and pull out all the stops, reaching into some new corners of my repertoire.

Guidepost tree

Guidepost tree

I started with one of my favorite aspects of the woods, moss, which was represented by lichenous oakmoss. The absolute is incredibly potent, deep, and dark. To represent the fragrant moist soil, patchouli makes a fine base. I was once repulsed by the smell of patchouli, until I smelled a bottle of beautifully aged high quality oil. It was a far cry from the rough edgy stuff that many people associate with the hippie era. Or perhaps it was me,and not the oil that had changed, and matured somehow. Powdery, earthy, soft, and bitter in a pleasant way. Next the trees themselves would need to be taken into account. For this I chose brightly scented black spruce and rosemary. To bring out the scent of sun warmed tree bark, I used warm scented vetiver. Often when you are in the woods, you will smell intriguing scents which are impossible to pinpoint. Perhaps a hidden wildflower is in bloom, or a tree is seeping with resinous sap where a woodpecker has been prospecting. To bring these into the picture, I turned to clary sage and some cheerful citrus oils.

Kodama scent roller

For my recent reformulation, in a base of jojoba and almond oil, I have added the complex and difficult to classify oil of spikenard. It has been used in Ayurvedic medicine primarily for its sedative properties, and is mentioned in the Bible in the Song of Solomon. I also added the clean, herbal tea tree oil. The oil base has the advantage of showing its top notes with more ease than the solid perfume, which seems a bit more persistent but also heavier.

Shimenawa

The name of this blend is from Shinto folklore, the ancient native religion of Japan. The Kodama are tree spirits, similar to the Dryads of Greek mythology. They are said to inhabit certain trees, and to be able to wander though out the mountains at will. Cutting down such a tree is thought to be a cause of misfortune, and thus these trees are marked with a rope known as shimenawa.

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